Voyager 1 Computer System gravitational slingshot how did gravity assist voyager 1 2 Voyager System Computer 1

Voyager 1 Computer System gravitational slingshot how did gravity assist voyager 1 2 Voyager System Computer 1
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Voyager 1 Computer System

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Interesting thoughts!

As time passed, the region would have cooled down considerably and contracted--thus pulling away from its surroundings and forming fractures akin to the cracks that form in mud as it becomes dry--but on a considerably larger scale.



Saturn is the smaller of the two gas-giant planets, twirling around our Sun, in the outer regions of our Solar System--far from the delightful warmth of our lovely incandescent roiling gas-ball of a Star. Jupiter is the larger of the duo of gas-giants dwelling in our Solar System, as well as the largest planet in our Sun's bewitching family, which is composed of eight major planets, an assortment of moons and moonlets, and a rich menagerie of smaller objects. Saturn is the second-largest planet in our Solar System--and probably the most beautiful.



Cassini wasn't originally designed to spot signs of life in the Enceladus plume. In fact, planetary scientists didn't even know that the plume existed until after the spacecraft reached Saturn.

Now of course this doesn't mean that you shouldn't let go of something during the waxing moon, or that you can't sign up for something new in the Waning moon. It does mean that if you have plans for this kind of work, including the tidal pull of the different moon phases in your plan, will support your actions in the same way that swimming with or against the tide makes your swim easier or more difficult.



During Cassini's close flyby of Enceladus on October 28, 2015, it detected molecular hydrogen as the spacecraft zipped through the plume of ice grains and gas spraying out from cracks slashing though the icy crust of the moon-world. Earlier flybys provided hints that a global subsurface ocean did, indeed, exist, sloshing around above a rocky core. Molecular hydrogen in the plumes could indicate hydrothermal processes, which could play the important role of providing the chemical energy so necessary to support life as we know it. In order to hunt for hydrogen specifically originating on Enceladus, the spacecraft dived particularly close to the strange slashed surface.



The hydrothermal vents on Earth's seafloor shoot out mineral-laden, hot fluid. This sustains some very unusual and unique forms of life--such as the wavy, wormish tubeworms--and other creatures that are able to thrive in this strange environment. Microbes can convert mineral-laden fluid into metabolic energy, making these ecosystems possible--both on Earth's seafloor and elsewhere.

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