Satern Voyager 1 voyager images voyager took of saturn 1 Satern Voyager

Satern Voyager 1 voyager images voyager took of saturn 1 Satern Voyager
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Satern Voyager 1

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Interesting thoughts!

One final important point to make about working with the Moon, is that it helps to realise that all things have the need for both generating and clearing. This means that both aspects of the lunar cycle can be used to your advantage for any particular issue or project. For example, if you are looking at having a huge clean-up at home, you could plan and design everything, including any furniture/room arrangement changes, during the waxing time. This is your time for creating new looks and new ways to live. You could then go on to do the cleaning up work during the Waning period. The perfect time to let go of the old, so that the new designs can take their place.



A New Moon is when the moon takes its monthly promenade and reaches the phase where it comes to rest between the sun and Earth, in this position the moon's dark side is facing us making it seem 'invisible'.



When Jupiter was born along with the rest of our Solar System, approximately 4.56 billion years ago, it twinkled like a star. The energy that it emitted--as a result of tumbling surrounding material--made Jupiter's interior searing-hot. In fact, the larger Jupiter grew, the hotter it became. At long last, when the material that it had drawn in from the whirling, swirling surrounding protoplanetary accretion disk--made up of nurturing dust and gas--was depleted, Jupiter may well have attained the enormous diameter of over 10 times what it has today. It also may have reached a truly toasty central temperature of about 50,000 Kelvin. During that long ago era, Jupiter twinkled, glittered, and sparkled like a little star, shining ferociously with a fire that was approximately 1% that of our much more brilliant Sun today.

The rifts themselves are buried far, far down, deep beneath dark volcanic plains on the near-side of our Moon and have been spotted only in the gravity data provided by GRAIL. The lava-flooded rift valleys are not like anything seen anywhere else on the lunar surface--but some planetary scientists think that they may have, at one time, long ago, resembled rift zones on our own planet, Venus, and Mars. The new findings are published in the October 1, 2014 issue of the journal Nature.



The Kuiper Belt is situated beyond the orbit of the beautiful, blue, and banded giant gaseous planet, Neptune--the outermost of the eight major planets of our Sun's family. Pluto is a relatively large inhabitant of this region, and it was--initially--classified as the ninth major planet from our Sun after its discovery by the American astronomer Clyde Tombaugh (1906-1997) in 1930. However, the eventual realization among astronomers that the frozen little "oddball" that is Pluto, is really only one of numerous other icy bodies inhabiting the Kuiper Belt, forced the IAU to formally define the term "planet" in 2006--and poor, pitiful Pluto lost its lofty designation of "major planet" only to be re-classified as a mere minor one--a demoted dwarf planet.



NASA's future exploration of ocean worlds is enhanced by HST's monitoring of Europa's possible plume activity and Cassini's long-term observations of the plume of Enceladus. In particular, the investigations of both ocean worlds are providing the groundwork for NASA's Europa Clipper mission, which is planned for launch in the 2020s.

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