Planets and Earth Revolves rotation vs revolution of earth difference and Revolves Earth Planets and

Planets and Earth Revolves rotation vs revolution of earth difference and Revolves Earth Planets and
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Planets and Earth Revolves

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Full moons make for a wonderful setting for criminal activity, as we find in detective novels. It's that night when the gruesome murderer commits the ghastly crime and is seen by a non-descript, aged neighbor. The neighbor's claim to credibility in the witness box is the fact that there was a full moon on the night in question and everything was there for all to see; it was only a matter of chance that he or she was the only one to spot it! Full moon nights also offer the perfect cover for the snooping detective to hide behind the bush with his dim-witted assistant in tow.



Imagine, a frigid, distant shadow-region in the far suburbs of our Solar System, where a myriad of twirling icy objects--some large, some small--orbit our Sun in a mysterious, mesmerizing phantom-like ballet within this eerie and strange swath of darkness. Here, where our Sun is so far away that it hangs suspended in an alien sky of perpetual twilight, looking just like a particularly large star traveling through a sea of smaller stars, is the Kuiper Belt--a mysterious, distant deep-freeze that astronomers are only now first beginning to explore. Makemake is a denizen of this remote region, a dwarf planet that is one of the largest known objects inhabiting the Kuiper Belt, sporting a diameter that is about two-thirds the size of Pluto. In April 2016, a team of astronomers announced that, while peering into the outer limits of our Solar System, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) discovered a tiny, dark moon orbiting Makemake, which is the second brightest icy dwarf planet--after Pluto--in the Kuiper Belt.



In addition, the newly collected data derived from the GRAIL mission helps astronomers redefine the late heavy bombardment--a proposed episode that occurred about 4 billion years ago, during which a heavy shower of projectiles pelted the bodies of the inner Solar System, including Earth and its beloved Moon, creating heavy lunar cratering in the process. The concept of the late heavy bombardment is primarily based on the ages of massive near-side craters that are either within, or adjacent to, dark, lava-flooded basins (lunar maria), that are named Oceanus Procellarum and Mare Imbrium. However, the composition of the material existing on and below the surface of the lunar near-side indicates that the temperatures beneath this area are not representative of Earth's Moon as a whole at the time of the late heavy bombardment. The difference in the temperature profiles may have caused scientists to overestimate the amount of crater-excavating projectiles that characterized the late heavy bombardment. New studies by GRAIL scientists indicate that the size distribution of impact craters on the lunar far-side is a more accurate reflection of the crater-forming history of the inner Solar System than those pock-marking the near-side.

On occasion February will have no full moons and January and March will both have two. In this case, you have two calendar blue moons in the same year. However, there can be no more than one in a year's time or it would not be that rare of an event. Using the Farmer's Almanac description there can be a maximum of one in a year.



The clear indications that Enceladus possesses liquid water, and perhaps life, catapulted the tiny moon into the same mighty league as its sister moons, Europa of Jupiter and Titan of Saturn, as a world that could potentially harbor precious living tidbits.



"Hydrogen is a source of chemical energy for microbes that live in the Earth's oceans near hydrothermal vents. Our results indicate the same chemical energy source is present in the ocean of Enceladus. We have not found evidence of the presence of microbial life in the ocean of Enceladus, but the discovery of hydrogen gas and the evidence for ongoing hydrothermal activity offer a tantalizing suggestion that habitable conditions could exist beneath the moon's icy crust," explained Dr. Hunter Waite in an April 13, 2017 Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Press Release. Dr. Waite is principal investigator of Cassini's Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS), and lead author of the paper titled Cassini Finds Molecular Hydrogen in the Enceladus Plume: Evidence for Hydrothermal Processes. The SwRI is in San Antonio, Texas.

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