Life in a Space Shuttle hibernating astronomers in the first mission to mars might Space in a Shuttle Life

Life in a Space Shuttle hibernating astronomers in the first mission to mars might Space in a Shuttle Life
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Life in a Space Shuttle

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So mark your calendar for the 16th June 2015 This is an awesome event itself but on this night you will have an amazing chance to view our celestial neighbors



Dr. Jason Soderblom said in a September 10, 2015 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Press Release that the evolution of lunar porosity can provide scientists with valuable clues to some of the most ancient life-supporting processes occurring in our Solar System. Dr. Soderblom is a planetary research scientist in MIT's Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences in Cambridge, Massachusetts.



The discovery of Makemake's little moon increases the parallels between Pluto and Makemake. This is because both of the small icy worlds are already known to be well-coated in a frozen shell of methane. Furthermore, additional observations of the little moon will readily reveal the density of Makemake--an important result that will indicate if the bulk compositions of Pluto and Makemake are similar. "This new discovery opens a new chapter in comparative planetology in the outer Solar System," Dr. Marc Buie commented in the April 26, 2016 Hubble Press Release. Dr. Buie, the team leader, is also of the Southwest Research Institute.

A Moon Made Of Lightweight Fluff! Methone is small and oval--and unlike other tiny objects, composed of rock and ice, that scurry around our Solar System. Methone, which was observed up close for the very first time in 2012, is not pockmarked by impacts like other worldlets of its kind. Instead, this strange little moon, is very smooth--it shows not a hill nor an impact crater anywhere on its weirdly smooth surface. This shiny, white, icy egg in Space, residing in a peaceful nest of ice crystals, is an enigma wrapped in a bewildering mystery that some astronomers may have solved. The answer to the bewitching riddle of Methone? It is composed of lightweight fluff!



Once in a blue moon. Technically, it takes the moon an average of 29.53 days to travel around the earth. Most months are longer than this. So, it is possible to have more than one full moon in one month. When this happens, the second moon is called a "calendar blue moon." Of course, this is a simple rule. So, let's complicate it!



However, the models become somewhat more complicated when different forms of ice are taken into consideration. The ice floating around in a glass of water is termed Ice I. Ice I is the least dense form of ice, and it is lighter than water. However, at high pressures, like those that exist in crushingly deep subsurface oceans like Ganymede's, the ice crystal structures evolve into something considerably more compact. "It's like finding a better arrangement of shoes in your luggage--the ice molecules become packed together more tightly," Dr. Vance said in his May 1, 2014 statement. Indeed, the ice can become so extremely dense that it is actually heavier than water--and therefore somersaults down to the bottom of the sea. The heaviest, densiest ice of all is believed to exist within Ganymede, and it is called Ice VI.

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