How Does Earth Orbit The Sun eli5 if the moon goes around the earth every 28 days why Earth Does How The Orbit Sun

How Does Earth Orbit The Sun eli5 if the moon goes around the earth every 28 days why Earth Does How The Orbit Sun
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How Does Earth Orbit The Sun

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Although the provisional designation of 2005 FY9 was given to Makemake when its discovery was made public, before that Dr. Brown's team had used the playful codename "Easter Bunny" for this small world, because of its discovery shortly after Easter.



The team's findings can also be applied to exoplanets, which are planets that circle stars beyond our own Sun. Some super-Earth exoplanets, which are rocky planets more massive than our own, have been proposed as "water worlds" covered with churning oceans. Could they have life? Perhaps. The potential would certainly be there. Dr. Vance and his team believe laboratory experiments and more sophisticated modeling of exotic oceans might help to find answers to these very profound questions.



Earth's Moon is the largest and brightest object suspended in the darkness of the starry night sky. It is both lovely and enchanting, and it has, since ancient times, inspired curiosity and wonder in human beings who gaze up at the mysterious sky after the Sun has set. As such, Earth's Moon has long served as the inspiration for imaginative, wild and marvelous tales--it is the stuff of mythology and folklore. The "Man in the Moon" refers to several fantastic images of a human face that certain traditions see outlined in the gleaming disk of the full Moon. In November 2013, astronomers using data from the lunar-orbiting twins composing NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, announced that they have been acquiring new and fascinating insight into how this bewitching "face," etched on our Moon's disk, received its captivating and enchanting good looks!

Titan has a radius that is about 50% wider than Earth's Moon. It is approximately 759,000 miles from its parent-planet Saturn, which itself is about 886 million miles from our Sun--or 9.5 astronomical units (AU). One AU is equal to the average distance between Earth and Sun, which is 93,000,000 miles. The light that streams out from our Star takes about 80 minutes to reach Saturn. Because of this vast distance, sunlight is 100 times more faint at Saturn and Titan than on Earth.



Fish can detect changes in pressure through their air bladder along with their lateral lines of their bodies caused by the weather. It stands to reason that fish can detect these pressure changes just like they detect pressure changes caused by the weather. Knowing this will help you know when fish will be active and when they will be in a more dormant state.



From these observations planetary scientists were able to determine that almost 98% of the gas in the plume is water, about 1% is hydrogen, and the rest is a combination of other molecules that include methane, ammonia, and carbon dioxide.

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