Giant Red Examples supergiant star astronomy britannicacom Giant Examples Red

Giant Red Examples supergiant star astronomy britannicacom Giant Examples Red
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Titan orbits Saturn once every 15 days and 22 hours. Like Earth's large Moon, in addition to many other moons in our Solar System, Titan's rotational period is precisely the same as its orbital period. This means that Titan only shows one face to its parent-planet, while the other face is always turned away.



Many people believe that astrology only concerns the sun. This is due to the Western world view of astrology, which has taken on the form of Zodiac horoscopes. However, in truth the study of astrology goes well beyond sun signs.



When Jupiter was born along with the rest of our Solar System, approximately 4.56 billion years ago, it twinkled like a star. The energy that it emitted--as a result of tumbling surrounding material--made Jupiter's interior searing-hot. In fact, the larger Jupiter grew, the hotter it became. At long last, when the material that it had drawn in from the whirling, swirling surrounding protoplanetary accretion disk--made up of nurturing dust and gas--was depleted, Jupiter may well have attained the enormous diameter of over 10 times what it has today. It also may have reached a truly toasty central temperature of about 50,000 Kelvin. During that long ago era, Jupiter twinkled, glittered, and sparkled like a little star, shining ferociously with a fire that was approximately 1% that of our much more brilliant Sun today.

Astronomers are still debating Titan's origin. However, its intriguing atmosphere does provide a hint. Several instruments aboard the Huygens spacecraft measured the isotopes nitrogen-14 and nitrogen-15 in Titan's atmosphere. The instruments revealed that Titan's nitrogen isotope ratio most closely resembles that seen in comets that exist in the remote Oort Cloud--which is a sphere composed of hundreds of billions of icy comet nuclei that circle our Star at the amazing distance of between 5,000 and 100,000 AU. This shell of icy objects extends half way to the nearest star beyond our own Sun.



Ganymede is the largest moon in our Solar System. Indeed, its impressive diameter of nearly 3,280 miles makes it almost as big as Mars! Astronomers have known since the 1990s that this frigidly cold moon, that circles around the gas-giant planet Jupiter, contains a hidden salty subsurface ocean of liquid water, sloshing around deep beneath its secretive shell of ice. However, in May 2014, planetary scientists announced that the situation may be somewhat more complicated--Ganymede's ocean might be organized like a multi-tiered sandwich, with ice and oceans stacked up in several layers, according to new NASA-funded research that models this enormous moon's composition.



However, the models become somewhat more complicated when different forms of ice are taken into consideration. The ice floating around in a glass of water is termed Ice I. Ice I is the least dense form of ice, and it is lighter than water. However, at high pressures, like those that exist in crushingly deep subsurface oceans like Ganymede's, the ice crystal structures evolve into something considerably more compact. "It's like finding a better arrangement of shoes in your luggage--the ice molecules become packed together more tightly," Dr. Vance said in his May 1, 2014 statement. Indeed, the ice can become so extremely dense that it is actually heavier than water--and therefore somersaults down to the bottom of the sea. The heaviest, densiest ice of all is believed to exist within Ganymede, and it is called Ice VI.

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