Astronomy Domes for Home 1000 images about my home observatory on pinterest Astronomy for Home Domes

Astronomy Domes for Home 1000 images about my home observatory on pinterest Astronomy for Home Domes
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Astronomy Domes for Home

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Interesting thoughts!

Aside from the monthly phases of the moon, there is also a daily lunar effect on fish feeding habits. Moonrise and moonset appear to be very good times to go fishing, if other factors like the weather are cooperative. Studies show that fish are more active 90 minutes before and after either the moonrise or moonset. Given this, you now know when is a good time to go fishing, provided it fits your schedule!



Cassini's successful mission of exploration to the Saturn system is over, but planetary scientists are left with a cornucopia filled with important new information that Cassini/Huygens sent back to Earth before its mission ended. A collaborative NASA/European Space Agency/Italian Space Agency mission, the robotic spacecraft was made up of two components. The first was the European Space Agency's (ESA's) Huygens Probe, that had been named in honor of the Dutch mathematician and astronomer Christiaan Huygens (1629-1695), who discovered Titan. The Huygens Probe also closely observed Saturn's lovely system of gossamer rings. The second component, the NASA-designed Cassini Orbiter, was named after the Italian-French astronomer Giovanni Dominico Cassini (1625-1712), who discovered four of Saturn's other intriguing, numerous, and icy moons.



In addition, the newly collected data derived from the GRAIL mission helps astronomers redefine the late heavy bombardment--a proposed episode that occurred about 4 billion years ago, during which a heavy shower of projectiles pelted the bodies of the inner Solar System, including Earth and its beloved Moon, creating heavy lunar cratering in the process. The concept of the late heavy bombardment is primarily based on the ages of massive near-side craters that are either within, or adjacent to, dark, lava-flooded basins (lunar maria), that are named Oceanus Procellarum and Mare Imbrium. However, the composition of the material existing on and below the surface of the lunar near-side indicates that the temperatures beneath this area are not representative of Earth's Moon as a whole at the time of the late heavy bombardment. The difference in the temperature profiles may have caused scientists to overestimate the amount of crater-excavating projectiles that characterized the late heavy bombardment. New studies by GRAIL scientists indicate that the size distribution of impact craters on the lunar far-side is a more accurate reflection of the crater-forming history of the inner Solar System than those pock-marking the near-side.

Dr. Soderblom calculated the gravity signatures both in and around 1,200 craters that had been excavated by impacting objects on the lunar far side. He then went on to compare the gravity within each crater with the gravity of the surrounding terrain. Dr. Soderblom did this in order to determine whether an impact increased or decreased the local porosity.



Coastal angers for centuries have looked to the tides for knowing when fishing will be at its best, yet many have not tied this into the moon itself. Although any one who has fished along the coast knows that the tides indeed determine when fishing will be good and when it is going to be slow to nearly impossible to catch a fish.



First launched as GRAIL A and GRAIL B in September 2011, the two probes, playfully dubbed Ebb and Flow, operated in an almost-circular orbit near the lunar poles at an altitude of about 34 miles until their mission concluded in December 2012. The distance between the twin probes altered slightly as they flew over areas of lesser or greater gravity that resulted from visible features--such as craters and mountains--as well as by hidden masses secreted beneath our Moon's surface.

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